15 February 2011

Common Mistakes: " In terms Of " Vs "In Term of"

Previously, my friend explained that we should use "in terms of" when the thing we describe is plural, and "in term of" when the thing we describe is singular. However, after a simple investigation, I realize that we should always use "in terms of".

According to Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, "in terms of" can be used for describing either plural or singular fact or event.

Here are two examples from the dictionary:
1. Femininity is still defined in terms of beauty. (Beauty is singular)
2. It's too early to start talking in terms of casualties. (casualties is plural)

"In term of", on the other hand, does not exist in the dictionary. Nevertheless, we still can use "a term of", "in the long term", etc.

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Written by: Xaivier Chia

Reference:
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English 4 with CD

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4 comments:

Farhan Jaidir said...

Thank you for enlighten my grammatical knowledge. I need these to improvise my writing skills.

Usama Al-Dughaishi said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Aziemah Gekozen said...

Very good info. Thanks for sharing! Really useful :)

Aziemah Gekozen said...

Very good info. Thanks for sharing! Really useful :)

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